Tag: fintech

Your Money in the News – July

This month: Why do people stay in debt?, Financial milestones for your 60s, Climbing credit card interest will eat tax cuts and wage increases, Beware student loan repayment scams, Mobile banking replacing bank branches…

Keeping it Real: A Short Q&A on Consumer Debt – KNOE

What is one reason people stay in debt?

They want to keep up appearances or try to keep up with the Jones, but end up damaging their financial security in the process.?The fear of feeling broke may be keeping people broke.

Related: ?Over 50 Broke and in Debt: ?Starting from Ground Zero

Does getting out of debt take sacrifice?

Yes, but practicing frugality to get out of debt can lead people to win with money. The lifestyle changes you make when getting out of debt can also be put to use to accumulate wealth.

Related: ?From Frugality to Financial Freedom: ?A Path for All

What is another reason people stay in debt?

People are afraid of change. If you have always charged on credit cards, or had a car loan, then you may have become conditioned to believe that paying tons in interest is normal. People know what to expect and it feels comfortable.

Related: ?Credit Card Payoff Strategies: ?What the Card Companies Don?t Want You to Know

Are some people really addicted to stuff?

Yes. People need to realize that no amount of stuff will make you happy and, at some point, too much stuff can actually cause both financial chaos and stress in your life. (The more stuff you have, the more stuff you have to take care of.)

Related: ?Declutter Your Life and Make Money

What is the main reason people stay in debt?

Some people stay in debt because they don’t know how to get out of debt. Financial literacy is not taught in schools but it needs to be. The first step in taking control is becoming informed.?

Once people get interested in their finances, they will understand for themselves how insane it is to carry consumer debt.

Related: ?DIY Credit Card Debt: ?A Guide to Permanent Debt Relief

In Your 60?s? Focus on These 6 Financial Targets – Motley Fool

We hear a lot about retirement planning when you?re young, but what should you be shooting for when you?re staring retirement in the face? These 6 financial targets may help give you some direction:

1. Have a fully loaded emergency fund

In the years leading up to retirement, having three to six months’ worth of living expenses in the bank will help you avoid debt later in life, and give you a measure of security as you look at letting go of that paycheck.

When you’re at the end of your working career, the last thing you need is for an unplanned bill to disrupt your financial plans.

2. Have 10 times your ending salary in a retirement account

While no one knows how long they will live there is no guarantee that you won?t run out of money. As a general rule, it’s smart to enter your full retirement with a minimum of 10 times your ending salary in an IRA or 401(k).

While Social Security will serve as a steady income source, it’ll only be enough to replace about 40% of the average worker’s pre-retirement earnings.

3. Pay off your mortgage

Once you stop working, you’ll be on a fixed income, so you’re better off not having a mortgage payment around to eat up a substantial chunk of it.

Unfortunately, an estimated 30% of seniors 65 and over continue to carry mortgage debt.

4. Eliminate credit card debt

If you have credit card debt, pay it off before making your retirement official. If you have credit card debt and a mortgage, pay off your credit card first.

Chances are, your credit card is charging at least double the interest rate you’re paying on your mortgage, which means the longer you carry a balance, the more money you stand to throw away.

5. Buy long-term care insurance

We don?t know what is going to happen to our bodies in the future. Medicare won’t cover long-term care. That’s why it pays to secure long-term care insurance during your 60s if you haven’t already. If you wait too long you can risk getting denied, or paying higher premiums.

While most Americans don?t believe they?ll need long term care, in reality, 70% of those turning age 65 can expect to use some form of long-term care during their lives. – AARP

6. Learn how Social Security works

It?s critical to understand how Social Security works so that you can plan a filing strategy ahead of time. The age you choose to file for Social Security could cause your payments change. You need to understand how and why.

Don?t ever file for Social Security before you?ve done your research.

How your Credit Card Interest Will Pay for the Next Recession – The New York Times

The Current Stats

National credit card debt has reached 1 trillion.

  • 70% of Americans carry a credit card balance from month to month.
  • The current average APR is 16.8%.
  • The average credit card balance is $5,700.

Credit card debt is growing at a rate of 4.7% while wages are growing at only 3%.

  • More families than ever have zero or negative wealth, excluding their homes.
  • Household net worth has decreased for all income groups since 2007 ? except the top 10%.
  • Net worth for the richest Americans is up 27%.
  • Net worth of the middle class has decreased 20-30%.

The wealthiest 10% now own about 75% of the nation?s total household wealth – up from less than 35% in the 1970s.

  • The nation?s richest 0.1% now own as much wealth as the bottom 90% .
  • For the bottom 90% – the ability to build wealth depends on the ability to save (which is impossible when interest rates are rising and eating into their earnings.)
  • The personal savings rate, at only 2.8 %, is heading in the wrong direction.

The Future Prediction

Ok, keeping the above statistics in mind, consider this – The Fed?s prediction is that the federal interest rate is on target to reach 3.4 percent by the end of 2020 from the current 1.9 percent. This means you?ll be paying more to get a mortgage, a new-car loan, or to carry a balance on your credit card. How much more? Possibly enough to absorb whatever extra income you might be enjoying from lower tax rates or higher wages.

Those who benefited the least from the recent tax cut ? wage workers, farmers and anyone else not in the top 10% of earners ? will have to pay the most ?in interest to mitigate the damage that the tax cuts caused to the economy. This could result in hundreds of dollars in additional interest every year per household for those carrying credit card debt.

Raising rates now, perversely, gives the Fed a monetary tool with which they would be able to fight the next recession ? by cutting those rates.

Student Loan Repayment Scams to Watch For – BBB

Massive student loan debt can make you feel desperate. But don’t get scammed. The Federal Trade Commission and Better Business Bureau are warning consumers about an increase in student loan repayment scams.

The FTC recently reached two multimillion dollar settlements with a shady student debt relief company and a law firm that preyed on desperate consumers with student loan debt. They both falsely promised to lower payments through alleged enrollment in student loan forgiveness or other programs – for a fee. They also lied about being able to improve credit scores – for a fee. Some scammers might also claim that they can save you money by consolidating your loans for you – for a fee.

Here?s the thing: ?
If you are eligible for loan deferments, forbearance, repayment forgiveness or loan discharges, you can do it yourself without a fee. Same with loan consolidation. ?

The FTC and BBB offer some tips to give these scammers a miss:

  • Go to bbb.org to check out companies before working with them. ?If you have been a victim of a scam, report it at bbb.org/ScamTracker
  • Go to the FTC page to check out student loan debt relief scams on record as well as tips to avoid them.
  • Never pay a fee upfront for help
  • Never share sensitive information, such as your FSA ID.
  • Scammers often have official-looking names and claim they have special access to certain repayment plans. They don?t.
  • Scammers will rush you saying you could miss qualifying for repayment plans, loan consolidation, or loan forgiveness programs if you don?t sign up right away. You won?t.
  • Legitimate repayment programs such as loan deferments, forbearance, repayment and forgiveness or loan discharges are FREE to access through U.S. Department of Education or your loan servicer at no cost.
  • Check out the Federal Student Loan site for federal student loan repayment options.?

If it seems too good to be true, it probably is. Any company that claims it can erase your student loan debt in minutes is lying. ??

These fraudsters commonly promise student debt forgiveness and lower payments. They often demand upfront fees up to thousands of dollars for this “service,” which is illegal. – CNBC

Related:? Know the Wolf:? Credit Card Counseling vs Debt Settlement

Branches Shrink as Banks Embrace Fintech – CNN

The rapid adoption of mobile banking has allowed big banks to shrink the number of expensive branches they operate. Traditional banks are being forced to innovate due to?competitive pressure from Silicon Valley as tech pushes into finance.?Amazon (AMZN), Apple (AAPL) and Facebook (FB) are all moving into financial technology.

Big banks are even working together on mobile payment systems. Bank of America teamed up with Wells Fargo (CBEAX), JPMorgan Chase, and other big banks to build Zelle, a digital payment service that rivals PayPal(PYPL) and Venmo. More than $25 billion moved through Zelle during the first quarter of 2018.

Big banks have sunk hundreds of millions of dollars into new technology aimed at luring customers online.?Bank of America?(BAC)?stated that deposits made on mobile devices are outpacing those made at branches for the first time. Some day branches may be a thing of the past.

Editor’s Note:? Mobile and online banking are convenient and can help you stay on schedule with set and forget recurring payments. But don’t let this make you lazy. Find out what can happen if you don’t check up on your payment system periodically -??Is Technology Making You Lazy? The Dark Side of Set and Forget Payments.

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Conscious Capitalism In The News – April 15th

Conscious Capitalism In The News: ?Blockchain is empowering the unbanked in Africa, Facebook?s ESG risks, Meet the designers who fixed Facebook – in a week, Green chemistry is a thing, and more…

How We Export Our Environmental Responsibilities – The Stanford Daily

Carbon offsetting, is a type of sustainability solution that encourages individuals and corporations to reduce their ?carbon footprint? by investing proportionally in other environmental conservation projects of some nature elswhere. These projects could be anything from planting trees, investing in environmental projects and green technology, or buying renewable energy contracts from solar and wind farms. This means that companies can pollute, and then make up for it by doing ?good? elsewhere.

For example, Google recently announced that it is now 100% ?carbon neutral,? which means that it has allegedly purchased enough solar and wind contracts to balance the amount of carbon it spews into the environment. While Google has stated that its goal is to ?get to a point where renewables and other carbon-free energy sources actually power (its) operations every hour of every day,? in the meantime Google is purchasing renewable energy outside of the region where it actually spews carbon.

Running parallel to carbon offsetting is the the ongoing exporting of e-waste. Electronic waste is comprised of toxic components which should not reach the environment. In 2014, 41.8 million tons of e-waste was generated worldwide, of which roughly 25% came from the United States. 80% of the e-waste generated in the US is exported to Asia where there are looser regulations for disposing of this stuff.

We are exporting our environmental responsibilities. How is this sustainable?

The world has entered a new era of ?conscious capitalism? where it has become fashionable to acknowledge profit?s negative externalities. But tackling urgent, irreversible climate change ? means reckoning with the difficult truth that we need structural shifts in the way we consume and produce.

Green Chemistry is A Thing – Sustainable Brands

The growing sentiment in the public today is that the chemical industry is not doing enough to promote safe and ?sustainable? chemistry. The truth is that the products manufactured today often have negative effects on both human health and the environment. 8.3 percent of all deaths and 5.7 percent of the total burden of disease worldwide are related to chemical exposure.

In an effort to address these concerns, the 2nd Green and Sustainable Chemistry Conference was held in Berlin last year. The conference gave industry leaders from companies such as The Dow Chemical Company, DuPont, Merck and Covestro a chance to debate what counts as ?green? and ?sustainable? for their organizations. The conference resulted in five key areas the panelists agreed were critical to inspiring a more sustainable chemical industry.

  1. Green chemistry needs to anticipate the problems it aims to solve. Aligning industry efforts with the UN Sustainable Development Goals cannot be done without looking at chemistry?s role.
  2. Green chemistry should not aim to justify negative perceptions of other elements of chemistry. Rather, it should focus on how to build upon the innovation of the chemicals industry and position itself as the next progressive step.
  3. Break down the green chemistry silo. Sustainability needs to address how users experience products, and how they can recycle and dispose of them.
  4. Involve the circular economy into the product life cycle. Chemical innovation is a cross-disciplinary effort; working collaboratively to create sustainable products provides an opportunity to promote the positives of green chemistry.
  5. Inform the public and demonstrate the value of safe, sustainable chemistry. Ensure that the public understands why a product is more sustainable than conventional alternatives, and what this means practically for the consumer, the environment and the industry.

The 3rd Green and Sustainable Chemistry Conference will be held in May 13th-16th in Berlin.

Fintech and Blockchain Empowering the Unbanked – Fortune

The World Bank estimates that between 2011 and 2014, the number of unbanked adults dropped by 20 percent to 2 billion. Why? Innovations in technology? particularly mobile money, which is helping to rapidly expand access to financial services in Sub-Saharan Africa.

A study by MIT estimates that in Kenya, access to mobile-money services increased daily per capita consumption levels by 2 percent, lifting people out of extreme poverty. By 2015, more than 270 mobile-money services were operating in 93 countries, with an estimated 411 million accounts.

Bitpesa is taking it a step further by offering cross border payments between Africa and the rest of the world. BitPesa is a digital foreign exchange and payment platform that leverages blockchain settlement to reduce the cost and increase the speed of business payments to and from frontier markets.

Founded in 2013, by Elizabeth Rossiello, in its first few years of operation it has already enabled over 6,000 users in Kenya, Tanzania, Nigeria and Uganda to make payments across borders and run their businesses, and has recently expanded to Ghana.

Bitpesa is the first company to create a market between an African currency and Bitcoin, the first company to create a market between mobile money and Bitcoin, and the first female founded crypto exchange in the world.

Facebook?s ESG Risks Come To Light – Morningstar

Companies with user data carry inherent ESG risks. For Facebook, data privacy is the major governance risk it carries.Since the Cambridge Analytica story first broke, Facebook stock fell 16% through April 5th. Funds which incorporated Facebook stock were hit hard by its data controversy.?

Loosely governed private data, the root cause of Facebook?s current trouble, is among the major environmental, social, and governance (ESG) risks for 2018 highlighted in a recent report from Sustainalytics, Morningstar’s ESG-research partner.

As a result, some investment funds now are lumping Facebook in with big polluters and other corporations they consider ethically challenged. BetaShares Global Sustainability Leaders ETF, the largest ethical ETF traded in Australia, removed Facebook from its fund.

Nordea Bank, the biggest bank in the Nordic region also blacklisted the Facebook stock, no longer allowing its sustainable investment unit to buy any more stock in Facebook due it?s privacy risks. As a group, such risks are referred to as governance risks, representing the ?G? in ESG. Today, governance is increasingly a core aspect of many portfolio managers? investing processes.

As a provider of a true-to-label ethical ETF, we have been careful to ensure there is diligent and ongoing monitoring of the constituents of the fund, to ensure the ETF continues to meet its objectives and those of its investors. – ?Alex Vynokur BetaShares CEO

We Fixed Facebook. You?re Welcome, Zuckerberg – FastCoDesign

Though Facebook has already announced some new policies, Zuckerberg?s response has run along the lines of ?we?re fixing it, but this will take years.? ?But when FastCoDesign challenged San Francisco design firm NewDealDesign to design a more transparent and honest Facebook, its designers fixed some of the social network?s biggest problems in less than a week. Here is an overview of what they came up with.

  1. Force all app developers into agreements that promise they don?t save your data on their own servers.
  2. When you?re logging into an app through Facebook for the first time, show a more specific breakdown of what the app sees, and exactly how the app plans to use your data.
  3. Users should have the option to use any app and choose to share nothing at all with a third-party company. It would simply verify that you are who you say you are through Facebook.
  4. Facebook should put simple reminders about which apps are accessing your information into your feed on a regular basis.
  5. When you type in Messenger, a pop-up should come up every now and again explaining that this supposedly private discussion is actually being recorded. It should do the same thing for text and photo posts in your feed.
  6. Facebook and other services should be constantly explaining what they do to the user, not having them sign a one-time contract and burying the information in deep settings and legal agreements.
  7. Finally, maybe we wouldn?t care so much if Facebook was both more transparent about how our data was being monetized, and if it cut the user in on the deal. Facebook is now making roughly $20 per U.S. user, per quarter.
If Facebook can?t win back the public?s affection, perhaps it can buy it instead. Cut us in!
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Over 50 Broke and in Debt: Starting from Ground Zero

Getting Woke

I?m sure there are more people out there like me, people who woke up one day and realized that they were fucked. Over 50, broke and in debt, I’d been living month to month for years.?When I read about how to invest for retirement and see those little graphs that show how much you would have saved if you’d started socking money away years ago, I feel completely defeated.?

I?m going financially backward, and I?m getting older.

Trying to stretch each paycheck to cover childcare, your kid?s needs, the bills – you really don?t think about what you will be up against when you?re older.?I used to have a three-month whiteboard on my kitchen wall. I would faithfully update it with my son?s soccer, football and Taekwondo practices. Fees. Where he was going after school when I was at work. More fees.?I remember having to start saving in February to pay for his summer camps, aka ?childcare,? because adults don?t get summers off from work. (Why are we and our kids on different time schedules anyway?)

Then they go to college.?I tried to get him through without a student loan. I failed. That last year I cosigned a loan. It?s a huge burden for him now as he applies to law school. We chat online about how large of a loan he would need for the schools he’s interested in. We discuss how to come up with all of the application fees without him incurring more debt.?I wish I could help him, but I’m tapped out, broke and in debt.?

Save for retirement?

When you become vividly aware of your financial vulnerability, it?s like waking up to a bad dream. ?Wtf were you thinking? That you would never be old???We all truly have but two choices: get old or die.?I certainly didn?t imagine that I would be dead, so how did I fail to imagine that I would still be alive, only older … broke and in debt?

The fear. The overwhelm. You want to run away from it. To do the exact opposite of what you need to do. I froze for a long time. Deer in headlights. I had no idea where to begin. At first, it took me a while to fully accept where I was. Then it took me even longer to learn to let go of how I got there.?And when I finally started researching, I found out that I wasn?t alone.

The hardest part isn?t starting, it?s getting out of your own way so that you can.

Related Content:? Forget Retirement – Here’s Why You Need To Start Investing Now

Our Relationship with Money

Money is loaded with emotional baggage. Fear, regret, greed, angst, sensuality, illusion. Behavioral economists have been studying this for years. Apparently, when you are experiencing scarcity of any form – time, money, love – it can affect you cognitively to the extent that you can make poor decisions, decisions that increase scarcity. Scarcity mindset. It decreases your ability to plan while increasing your impulsiveness.

I have friends whose debt is greater than half their home?s value. When they get a windfall, they buy season passes to something. Or a new toy. In that same breath, they might mention how they wished they hadn?t taken that 2nd or 3rd mortgage. ?The things we could have done with that money!? These are good people, smart people! It became apparent to me that when you are used to living month-to-month, you are used to spending all of your money every month.?And this got me asking some deep questions about my relationship with money.

What is money anyway?

Digits in a ledger, with the power to dictate how we spend our waking hours. So, really important digits in a ledger. But the financial world can be intimidating. Take compound interest, for example. That thing that will definitely bleed us out if we?re broke and in debt, or could possibly multiply our money if we?re invested. While the theory itself may be simple to understand, the actual calculation is a far cry from balancing a checkbook.

The more you learn about money, the more you wake up to how crazy debt is.?Yet it’s up to me, and only me, to rid myself of any ignorance of something that has such immense control over my life, how I spend my time, where I can go, and what I can do.?I know I have baggage around money. But at this stage in the game, I also know that I don?t have time to uber-analyze why.?Because the other thing that goes with saving money is time. You need them both.?And I?m running out of time.

Related Content:? Ten Quick Ways To Make Money While Helping The Planet

Reining It In, a Bit at a Time

So, I decided it was time to learn how to crawl out of this mess. And to do this, I had to first stop freaking out about it. My odds of facing this challenge with a self-deprecating mindset were low. I tried to treat myself with compassion and forgive myself.?I had to start, somewhere.?And when you’ve been using your credit cards as a source of income, looking at your?credit card statements isn’t fun. It brings up?a flood of negative feelings. I tried my best to do it with the cold eye of a surgeon?s scalpel. Void of emotion.

I approached it like a puzzle. Like a game. Something separate from me.

First I looked for any recurring payments that I might have set up and forgotten about. Book club websites, Skype, Amazon Prime, Netflix, memberships… I canceled them all. It felt cleansing. Did I notice? At first, a little bit. Then?I stopped using credit cards completely. This took a huge change in mindset. I?d always looked at credit cards as that go-to?when something came up.

No longer could I visit my family on holidays. You search for hours to get a good price on a ticket and end up paying in interest what it would have cost you to fly first class. No longer could I buy that new thing because it was on sale.??I had to charge it but it was 20% off!? Five years later, you?ve paid double for the thing that you’d already gotten rid of two years prior. Crazy!

How I Hacked Peace Of Mind

The first rift between my emotions and money occurred when I began to see that money had nothing to do with spending. Spending was something I did. Money is just a tool. And I had some problems that only that tool could fix. If I truly wanted to get out of debt forever, I had to create a platform where going back into debt at the slightest mishap or desire was off the table.?I had zero savings. Everything always went somewhere. Why couldn?t I just leave it alone? Just let it sit there and ignore it?

I started to ignore the money in my account in the same way I had been ignoring my debt. I pretended that it just wasn?t there, and continued living as if I just didn?t have any to spend.?So far I?ve saved a couple months’ worth of monthly expenses. Ten years ago that much money would be vacation fodder. Today, I want to be alright with myself more than I want a couple weeks of hotels and airplanes and souvenirs. A vacation would be lovely but it would also set me back in time.?And I?m terrified that I won?t have enough time.?Who is going to take care of me if I get sick? The government? Ha!

My biggest fear is that I will die broke and alone in some shit apartment, and no one will know until they smell the body.

Related Content:? How To Reduce Your Tax Bill, Save For Retirement, and Save the World

Recreating My Relationship With Money

Just recently, I?ve begun to learn a bit about how to make money grow. Not by reading expensive and complicated financial books or hiring a financial advisor, but by actually doing it on a tiny scale. Nothing I can?t afford to lose. Like 25-100 bucks a month. I?ve lost nothing yet. I?m diversified?(don?t put all your eggs in one basket).?Microbalances. (Tiny amounts.)?You can see what it?s doing and learn without hurting yourself.?I started picking up part-time gigs. I stopped buying coffee and other little crap throughout the day. I bought a cheap unlocked smartphone and a budget sim to get out from underneath my ridiculous cell phone contract.

The internet can open doors for you if you use it.

The internet gives us access to free financial information. I started reading Investopedia, watching Youtube videos, investment for beginners blogs, anything. I discovered that I didn?t need some professional financial person to introduce me to the world of finance and investing, and I also learned that you don’t have to be rich to invest.

Today there are services for people just like me to learn about investing by doing it on a small scale. I started learning about?roboadvisors, fintech sites, cryptocurrency.?And then another weird thing happened. I actually became interested. The financial world was no longer a necessary evil, it was fun. Bit by bit the little pieces of financial jargon were no longer as mysterious as Chinese characters. They began to have some context.

It’s easier to play the game when you are interested in it.

Related Content: Start Impact Investing For As Little as $50 (And Get Another $50 For Free)

As I became aware of my feelings around money, angst, excitement, stress, fear, greed, desire, depression, sensuality, I tried to be mindful of them and acknowledge them without getting involved. I also began to challenge my thoughts, to get used to the discomfort of these emotions, and just sort of check them out rather than let them dictate my behavior.

I’ll be honest, it isn?t very pleasant at first. Perhaps this is why so many people pay high fees for brokers to make decisions for them so that they don?t have to get involved. But it?s getting easier. I?m learning. And the more I learn, the more I realize that I’m not alone in the struggle to extricate emotions from money issues.

I found out that even Wall Street and emotions are not mutually exclusive. I laughed out loud when I discovered that you can check the emotions of today?s market on CCN?s Fear and Greed index.? Nobel?Prize Winner Robert Shiller, professor of economics at Yale, talks about the relationships of the stock market and human emotions. He says that bubbles and crashes involve the human psyche on a mass scale. And it all makes sense. We can separate nothing from our humanness.

Money is a human creation.

Flipping The Script

  • We needn’t be?ashamed to discover that our emotions around money may have been causing us to make long-term financial mistakes. Many of us inherited weird stuff from our parents and culture around money.
  • We shouldn’t be afraid of not knowing enough about the financial world to start learning. Many of us have zero financial education. I remember having a one-off class on balancing a checkbook in Middle School. That?s about it.
  • Couple this lack of financial education with the aggressive marketing and consumerism we have been subject to from impressionable ages thereon, and you have an interesting mix of bullshit running malware through your head when it comes to managing money. My senior year in college I received countless pre-approved credit card offers after starving to death to work my way through school for years as a single mom. It was like a feast. My new consumer debt slipped right in next to my student loan. I was a good little American.
Our culture literally screams ?spend!? everywhere.

We are programmed to comply on a daily basis. A new phone. A new car. New, new, new. We need the latest iteration of everything. We have a twisted and erroneous idea of a success. It is empty. Short-lived.

We are leveraging our future for the appearance of success.

We get into debt, get out of debt, get into debt, get out of debt. The cycle is insane. And a lot of us have been doing it for a long time.

I?m intent on shattering this financial pathology.?A few more months of saving and I will be able to attack those credit card balances so I can stop the bleeding once and for all. I imagine the joy I will feel when they are gone. I know it won?t be easy. And I now know it’s going to take some time. But I can use that time to learn about how to grow the money I will get to keep after I?ve finished. And I can use that time to heal from the twisted mentality that has kept me swimming in this financial toilet bowl for years.?

I?m over 50. I’m broke and in debt. I?m at Ground Zero.

So fucking what.?It?s a mathematical puzzle game. And I?m going to learn how to play it.


The stories in Life are real. Sometimes the names are changed at the author’s request.

Send us your story if you’ve been duped, on the road to financial recovery, conquered your finances, or want to give feedback. feedback@wellwallet.com

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